How links to MailOnline stories about paedophiles, murderers, a multi-millionaire Tory MP, a drug-dealing aristocrat and Josef Fritzl were removed by Google

Google announced today that it will apply the 'right to be forgotten' rules will apply to all its versions  
Google announced today that it will apply the 'right to be forgotten' rules will apply to all its versions

Europe's top court ruled that people have the right to have 'inadequate' and 'irrelevant' results about them wiped from the web, which has led to the search engine being bombarded with requests. 

More than 200,000 removal requests involving more than 700,000 URLs have been made to Google worldwide.

The content itself has not been deleted from MailOnline, but Google will not list it in search results.

Instead, users searching for the topic on google.co.uk will see a message that says: ‘Some results may have been removed under data protection law in Europe' at the bottom of the page.

The links to MailOnline articles to be removed include:

Content removed from Google under 'right to be forgotten' rule will now be hidden from all versions of its search engine

By Matt Dathan

Content blocked from Google under the 'right to be forgotten' rules will be removed from all versions of the internet giant's search engine, it was announced today.  

The current rules only apply to versions of Google in the EU, where citizens can request information to be removed from search results. 

Users can still find the full list of unedited results by using international versions, such as Google.com.  

But Google said today that it will apply the rules universally, meaning removed results will not appear on any version of the search engine when they are being viewed from countries where the removal was approved. 

The European Court of Justice made the landmark ruling in 2014 and since then Google has received more than 380,000 removal requests, with around four in ten requests accepted. 

The technology giant has been under pressure from the French data protection authority to remove data from its sites globally and threatened to fine the company if it did not do so. 

Google had fought off the attempts, claiming it would have a chilling effect on freedom of information.  

Notice: MailOnline has received a number of notifications requesting removal of links. The  request includes a note to say 'in many cases, the affected queries do not relate to the name of any person mentioned'

Notice: MailOnline has received a number of notifications requesting removal of links. The request includes a note to say 'in many cases, the affected queries do not relate to the name of any person mentioned'

It has now given in and said the changes will apply in the near future, but did not set a date for the change.

The new rules will be applied when a European IP address is detected - regardless of the version of Google being used - and remove approved items. 

RIGHT TO BE FORGOTTEN ONLINE 

Ruling: The ECJ's 'right to be forgotten' ruling allows European citizens to request that links to 'inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant' information be removed from Google results
Ruling: The ECJ's 'right to be forgotten' ruling allows European citizens to request that links to 'inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant' information be removed from Google results

The European Data Protection Regulation, Article 17 includes the ‘right to be forgotten and to erasure'.

Under Article 17, people who are mentioned in the data have the right to ‘obtain from the controller the erasure of personal data relating to them and the abstention from further dissemination of such data.'

This relates to data about the person when they were a child, when the data is no longer relevant or necessary for the purpose it was collected, the person who owns the content withdraws their consent, the storage period has expired, or if it was gathered illegally.

The EU defines ‘data controllers' as ‘people or bodies that collect and manage personal data'.

The EU General Data Protection Regulation means any data controller who has been asked to remove data must ‘take all reasonable steps, including technical measures' to remove it.

If a data controller does not take these steps they can be heavily fined. 

Renate Samson, chief executive of privacy campaign group Big Brother Watch, welcomed the change.

'The move by Google to ensure 'right to be forgotten' across European versions of Google offers reassurance to the thousands of regular, ordinary citizens who have sought the right for inaccurate or out-of-date content about them to be blocked from Google's searches,' she said.

'Whilst right to be forgotten remains a controversial issue, it is a key part of the new European General Data Protection Regulations set to be in place within the next couple of years. Google's move therefore is a necessary step in the direction of improved data protection.' 

Under the ECJ ruling, citizens can apply for information to be removed if the content is 'inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant'.

The ruling was criticised by the then Culture Secretary Sajid Javid , who said criminals were using it to hid their murky pasts, condemning the decision by 'unelected judges'. 

In a speech to newspaper editors, he said: ‘Since Luxembourg's unelected judges created the so-called “right to be forgotten”, Google has been receiving a demand for deletion every 90 seconds.

‘Each day, a thousand requests pour in from people who, for one reason or another, would prefer their pasts to be kept secret.

‘Criminals are having their convictions airbrushed from history even if they have since committed other, similar crimes.

‘Terrorists have ordered Google to cover up stories about their trials.'

Mr Javid added: ‘The “right to be forgotten” is censorship by the back door. Stories are not being deleted from archives because of the ruling, but if they cannot be found by the search engines they may as well not be there at all.'  

Examples of links deleted by Google include a number of MailOnline articles detailing issues ranging from drug abuse to incest, murder and spying.

For instance, MailOnline received a request to remove a May 2009 article describing the sordid captivity in which Josef Fritzl kept his family.

The piece was based on extracts from the book ‘The Crimes of Josef Fritzl : Uncovering the Truth'. Publisher Harper Collins told MailOnline at the time it did not know who sent the request

Other MailOnline stories removed from Google results include claims from April 2013 that a ten-year-old girl could have died if her parents had relied on the NHS 111 helpline.

More recently, Google removed a MailOnline story about a teenager, Kyle Ivison , slapped with an Asbo for committing 40 per cent of the offences in his town.

The content itself has not been deleted from MailOnline , but Google will not list it in search results.

Instead, users searching for the topic on google.co.uk will see a message that says: ‘Some results may have been removed under data protection law in Europe' at the bottom of the page.

The ECJ ruled that people had a right to ask for ‘inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant, or excessive' information about them to be dropped from internet searches.

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